studying the city (Annette Koh)

Jul 17

[video]

[video]

Jul 16

[video]

[video]

Jul 15

[video]

Jul 14

City to host Complete Streets Public Information Meeting -

hnlnco:

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City to host Complete Streets Public Information Meeting

Honolulu – Mayor Kirk Caldwell announced today that a Complete Streets Public Information Meeting will be held on Tuesday, July 15, 2014, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Neal Blaisdell Center, Pikake Room.

“/These are organic fields?/
They look at me oddly. Yes.
/Is that better than regular fields?/
Why would it be better?
/Because there aren’t any chemicals. Is the work better?/
The shorter of the two snorts. No chemicals, but it’s the same. Ninety-nine cents for a bag of onions, he says, nodding at the sacks.
/It’s not better to work in an organic field?/
It’s the same.” — Tracie McMillan, The American Way of Eating. The problem with using organic as a proxy for good (“good” meaning everything from ethical to sustainable) is, as Julie Guthman has pointed out, organic is not a label about labor.

[video]

Jul 13

[video]

The American Way of Eating

Tracie McMillan's triptych of the American food system — The American Way of Eating — is based on her months of fieldwork as a fieldworker in the Central Valley, a produce stocker in Walmart, and a kitchen worker in Applebees. One of her major contributions is foregrounding food distribution networks.

The more time I spend traversing the divide between Detroit and its suburbs, the more I realize the term “food desert” isn’t quite right. Massive amounts of food floods into Detroit every single day, through its produce terminal and wholesale markets. Starting at midnight, semi after semi comes in full of produce, bringing loads from the nation’s eastern ports: Chilean plums and grapes through New York, Honduran melons through Miami. In the mid-twentieth century, Detroit had four wholesale markets, sprawling conglomerations of market stalls and loading docks where farmers and brokers sent their wares to be sold, and where stores and restaurants came to buy it; today, two remain. Other places, like thriving New York City, have seen their market districts erode as property values shot up, while the most lauded market preservation projects like Philadelphia’s Reading Terminal have focused on developing retail food shops. Either way, those cities have lost most of something that Detroit still has intact: food infrastructure.

Food pours into the city every day, and the wholesale markets here are its first way station. It’s impossible to know exactly how much comes through the Terminal and Eastern markets, though, because nobody keeps an eye on the volume of sales. (The USDA tracked wholesale market sales until the late 1990s, but stopped when private distribution centers grew so large that officials realized they only had part of the picture — and couldn’t compel private companies to divulge their sales figures.) Organizationally, markets like the Produce Terminal and Eastern Market work like shopping malls: The market provides a building and basic infrastructure, but each vendor operates independently of the market itself, and of other vendors. Compliance with food safety and fair business practices is the business of each vendor, each of whom deals individually with the government agency responsible for oversight; the market itself is little more than a landlord.

[Peaches and Greens - a Detroit-based produce project]

Corner stores can get deliveries from chip manufacturers or soda companies and dry goods like pasta can find their way onto shelves via jobbers, independent distributors who take a case of spaghetti to one store, three to another, and on down the line. Yet there’s never really been an equivalent for produce; corner stores typically specialize in shelf-stable items that don’t need the constant attention that a case of lettuce does, making small-scale produce distribution a dicey entrepreneurial pursuit.

In a lot of ways , it still is, but in early 2010 federal officials introduced a new coupon for WIC clients, which could only be redeemed for fruits and vegetables. In Michigan, then, any small store that makes the investment in produce has access to the $16 million market created by these new vouchers. 

Peaches and Greens had launched a mobile market in 2008, opening up the store about four months later. When the WIC program changed its rules, they hit upon an idea: Instead of stocking only their own stores, they could help justify the hassle of these early morning trips by functioning as a small-scale distributor for other stores. Most of what we buy today will go to the Peaches and Greens store and truck, but when Marvin returns to the market in a couple days, he’ll be buying stock for a number of corner stores that have begun selling produce, as required by the WIC program.

Jul 12

waltz century :

Entrance to the World’s Fair Vienna (World exposition in Vienna), Austria, 1873

The Vienna Museum aka Wien Museum Karlsplatz currently features the exhibit THE METROPOLIS EXPERIMENT - VIENNA AND THE 1873 WORLD EXHIBITION (Experiment Metropole 1873: Wien Und Die Weltausstellung). As part of our project on public memories in public space, my group ended up spending over four hours at the museum.
In 1850, Vienna’s population had been 550,000. By the World Exhibition in 1873, the city had doubled to over 1 million people due to massive in-migration from all reaches of the Austro-Hungarian empire and geographic expansion of the municipal boundaries. In 1857, Franz Joseph ordered the demolition of the medieval city wall to make room for major public projects and the mansions of “new money” industrialists and bankers.

With the completion of Vienna’s first mountain spring water pipeline in 1873, a safe supply of water was ensured for the rapidly growing but hygienically backward city. Another large-scale effort was made to protect Vienna against flooding: In no less than seven years, a new, perfectly straight bed for the waters of the Danube was dug as part of this river engineering project. Vienna’s biggest cemetery, the Zentralfriedhof necropolis, was established in the same period.
With rapid urban expansion came segregation along social lines between the city centre and the periphery. Mass immigration and the growth of an industrial proletariat went hand in hand with housing shortages and miserable living conditions. The years around 1870 also saw the start of the speculation-driven development of new districts on the outskirts of Vienna, where buildings rose up along monotonous gridiron streets.

waltz century :

Entrance to the World’s Fair Vienna (World exposition in Vienna), Austria, 1873

The Vienna Museum aka Wien Museum Karlsplatz currently features the exhibit THE METROPOLIS EXPERIMENT - VIENNA AND THE 1873 WORLD EXHIBITION (Experiment Metropole 1873: Wien Und Die Weltausstellung). As part of our project on public memories in public space, my group ended up spending over four hours at the museum.

In 1850, Vienna’s population had been 550,000. By the World Exhibition in 1873, the city had doubled to over 1 million people due to massive in-migration from all reaches of the Austro-Hungarian empire and geographic expansion of the municipal boundaries. In 1857, Franz Joseph ordered the demolition of the medieval city wall to make room for major public projects and the mansions of “new money” industrialists and bankers.

With the completion of Vienna’s first mountain spring water pipeline in 1873, a safe supply of water was ensured for the rapidly growing but hygienically backward city. Another large-scale effort was made to protect Vienna against flooding: In no less than seven years, a new, perfectly straight bed for the waters of the Danube was dug as part of this river engineering project. Vienna’s biggest cemetery, the Zentralfriedhof necropolis, was established in the same period.

With rapid urban expansion came segregation along social lines between the city centre and the periphery. Mass immigration and the growth of an industrial proletariat went hand in hand with housing shortages and miserable living conditions. The years around 1870 also saw the start of the speculation-driven development of new districts on the outskirts of Vienna, where buildings rose up along monotonous gridiron streets.

Jul 11

victortsu:

Bye House / Wall House (by Collectie Nederlands Architectuurinstituut)


John Hejduk - Ed Bye House (Wall house II), originally designed in 1973 for a plot in Ridgefield CT, later constructed in 2001 in Groningen. Via.
"Passing through the wall is a representation of presence—one side is the past, the other the future"

victortsu:

Bye House / Wall House (by Collectie Nederlands Architectuurinstituut)

John Hejduk - Ed Bye House (Wall house II), originally designed in 1973 for a plot in Ridgefield CT, later constructed in 2001 in Groningen. Via.

"Passing through the wall is a representation of presence—one side is the past, the other the future"